21 Comments

  1. Artakan
    May 14, 2017 @ 11:29 am

    Thank you so much, that was a great tutorial !

    I am using Vultr, and I wanted to let other know that they block port 25 by default. So sending mail is not working. I just contacted them to see if they can lift the block.

    Other than that, looking forward for the next tutorial.

    Reply

  2. Kahana82
    May 15, 2017 @ 1:31 pm

    @ROLF
    Just one quick question: is that small linode VPS able to handle the locally stored blockchain over time ?

    From the whitepaper I got there is a 2MB block every 2.5min, which translates to an added 33,75 GB (2MB*(60/2.5)*24*30) of local storage each month or 405GB per year.
    I’m I mistaken on how to calculate this ?

    Reply

    • Rolf
      May 22, 2017 @ 8:53 pm

      The blocks won’t be full for a while. You should have time. That’s one of the reasons I like Linode – you can upgrade in place to a bigger Linode.

      Reply

  3. Kevin Wells
    May 17, 2017 @ 3:42 am

    Good article , esp on the system security, thanks. Looking forward to part 2.

    Reply

  4. Carl P
    May 19, 2017 @ 12:04 am

    Thank you very much I have been looking for this information for a while, cant wait to finish things up in part two.

    Reply

  5. Tom
    May 22, 2017 @ 2:27 pm

    Hey Rolf!

    Thanks a lot for part 1, great work! When will part 2 be published?

    The question of Kahana82 is mine as well. What traffic and storage is required long term for running a ZEN full node?

    Reply

    • Rolf
      May 22, 2017 @ 8:54 pm

      I intend to publish part 2 later this week, after the launch. The node software is getting published last minute. This is not a bleeding edge tutorial, but I will provide a complete guide as soon as I can. Glad you all like the first part!

      Also, the blocks won’t be full for a while. You should have time. That’s one of the reasons I like Linode – you can upgrade in place to a bigger Linode.

      Reply

      • Sergey
        June 6, 2017 @ 5:30 am

        Hi! When we can see part 2?

        Reply

        • Rolf
          June 7, 2017 @ 9:35 pm

          posted it earlier this week.

          Reply

  6. Build a ZenCash Secure Node Part 2 - Build the Zen Node - Block Operations
    June 6, 2017 @ 11:26 am

    […] you have a secure Linux server prepared, you can set up a Zen Node. See Build a ZenCash Secure Node – Part 1 – Prepare the VPS if you still need to prepare your […]

    Reply

  7. albert
    June 6, 2017 @ 12:38 pm

    Hi please, do you have make the part 2 ?

    Reply

    • Rolf
      June 7, 2017 @ 9:35 pm

      yes, I posted it.

      Reply

      • Jeffrey
        June 8, 2017 @ 1:07 pm

        Is it possible to setuo multiple nodes from 1 ip?

        Reply

  8. Jeffrey
    June 8, 2017 @ 11:50 am

    Hello rolf.

    Is it possible to run multiple nodes from 1ip? Please let me know!

    Reply

  9. AH
    June 14, 2017 @ 1:44 am

    Would be cool if you’re able to post a basic virtualbox VMDK, that could be configured with the final details to make a node.

    That way people could set up a node on their PC in a few minutes.

    Reply

  10. Adam
    July 10, 2017 @ 9:11 am

    Hey Rolf,

    I’ve been going through this great tutorial but ran into a problem when it came to setting up the email, I left the default parameters as you suggested but I think the second parameter was wrong, it was znode followed by the nodes ip address with the first 3 numbers missing.

    I assume it probably wanted the full FQDN domain name in there (which I don’t have at this point)!

    Any suggestions!

    Thanks

    Reply

  11. Laszlo Nemeth
    August 28, 2017 @ 12:11 pm

    Hi! Thanks for the nice tutorial!
    All seems to be clear, except the necessity of the TCP ports 80 and 443 being open to the public. It looks like node communication will run over port 9033?
    It is an important aspect for me, as I operate some highly reliable VMware servers around the country, where I could put zencash node VMs, but public IP is a valuable asset, and ports 80 and 443 are already in use at most sites/most IPs.
    Thanks, Laszlo

    Reply

    • Rolf
      August 28, 2017 @ 12:19 pm

      ports 80 and 443 are used by letsencrypt. You can use some other method to get a secure certificate, then you won’t need to use those ports.

      Reply

      • Laszlo Nemeth
        August 30, 2017 @ 1:14 am

        great, thank you! letsencrypt also has DNS verification, that’ll just need some script trickery to automate.

        Reply

  12. Alex
    September 12, 2017 @ 4:17 pm

    port 9033?

    Reply

  13. Josh
    October 13, 2017 @ 4:31 pm

    Rolf- wow great tutorial quick and clean!

    Reply

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